CDP Choline (Citicoline) Nootropic Review of Benefits, Uses and More..

CDP Choline (Citicoline) is a naturally occurring, powerful choline source known to enhance memory, improve cognitive functions and promote general brain health. Considered a safe brain supplement, it is used both on its own and in many Nootropic stacks, especially with Racetams.

Type: Cholinergic Supplement
Used For: Memory Enhancement, Mental Clarity, Focus, Brain Health, Mental Energy, Age-Related Memory Loss, Stroke, Glaucoma, ADHD, Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia
Half-Life: 55hrs-70hrs
Typical Dosage: 250 mg-750 mg
Drug Interactions: No Known Interactions
Supplement Interactions: No Known Interactions

What is CDP Choline (Citicoline)?


CDP Choline (Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine) also more well known as Citicoline, is an enhanced version and unique form of choline, a nutrient naturally found in the body. It is popularly supplemented and used as a highly effective and safe Nootropic supplement.

CDP Choline Benefits & Uses

Citicoline is best known for its potential to boost memory and brain function while protecting the health of neurons and brain cells. It is also a popular addition to several Nootropic stacks where it is noted to be effective at amplifying their effects.

Choline is a precursor to the important neurotransmitter Acetylcholine, a brain chemical which is released by neurons and involved in a number of cognitive processes like the formation of memory, learning capacity and reasoning.

It is needed to form the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine, an integral component of brain cell membranes involved in maintaining the integrity of the cell membrane and supporting cellular communication.

While there are many choline sources to consider, Citicoline is considered unique. Before it reaches the brain, it splits into both choline and cytidine (another nutrient) and gets separately transported into the brain and other tissues. Once cytidine is in the brain, it converts into uridine which is thought to help increase synthesis of brain phosphatidylcholine in neuron membranes.

In addition, the released choline acts to help increase present choline levels in the brain. Higher levels of choline can lead to increased levels of Acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter important for synaptic plasticity and learning.

Citicoline is most popularly used to promote enhanced memory and cognitive function but it may also have significant effects on mental energy and clarity. These effects typically lead to boosting attention span which may also result in a better ability to concentrate and focus.

Recent studies also indicate that Citicoline may be potentially helpful in the treatment of many medical problems including age-related neurodegenerative diseases, ADHD, stroke, glaucoma and may even help to reduce cravings related to cocaine dependency.

However, Citicoline (CDP choline) is sold as a health supplement only. Although there is a lot of promising research, it is not approved by the FDA as a drug to treat or prevent any conditions.

What are all the potential benefits of CDP Choline (Citicoline) and why use it? This article will examine the effects and benefits associated with this supplement, what it is typically stacked with, the potential side effects and dosage guidelines. 

CDP Choline For Memory


One of the most noticeable benefits of using CDP Choline, known more widely as Citicoline, is in regards to enhancing memory function and this is one of the primary and most common reasons Nootropic users seek out and use this supplement.

There have been many research studies indicating its effectiveness for enhancing memory and a slew of anecdotal user reviews reporting this positive effect.

Some people may experience this effect in ways such as recalling information with more ease, remembering small details, facts, conversations or dreams and getting an additional boost in learning capacity and these effects may be why CDP choline is often associated with anti-aging.

CDP Choline is a water-soluble compound that is a source of choline thought to be more readily absorbed by the body than many other choline sources and easily crosses the blood-brain barrier after ingestion. This makes it a closer precursor to Acetylcholine, an important factor since different types of choline can differ in this ability.

Choline is an essential nutrient needed to produce Acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that sends signals across synapses to other neurons and is associated with the development and formation of memory and learning capacity.

As such, by supplementing with CDP Choline, you may increase the amount of available choline supply in the bloodstream which then promotes increased acetylcholine synthesis leading to raising its level in the brain. This may encourage more memories to be stored and the speed to which we can recall them.

Citicoline

• Supports memory, mental focus & clarity
• Raises levels of Acetylcholine neurotransmitter
• Promotes brain cell communication

SHOP Top Citicoline Products

CDP Choline Benefits For Mental Energy and Cognition


The benefits of CDP Choline may extend past memory enhancement, additionally offering a boost in mental energy and enhancing focus and concentration.

Increasing the level of circulating Acetylcholine within the brain is thought to be associated with many of the related cognitive benefits of CDP Choline. This neurotransmitter is also thought to be involved in the ability to focus and concentrate.

When using CDP Choline supplements, many users report experiencing clearer thoughts, a better ability to pay attention, much sharper focus and the ability to concentrate for longer periods of time without getting distracted.

Some of these effects may also be attributed to this supplement promoting increased blood flow to the brain, which helps to boost oxygen uptake and glucose metabolism, the brains main energy source. This leads to providing the brain with fuel and can result in increased mental energy and even alertness.

When mental energy is boosted, it can lead to feeling more motivated, attention span is increased and the reduction of mental fatigue helps you to more easily focus and concentrate on tasks at hand.

Additionally, although research is preliminary, there is some evidence suggesting that Citicoline may improve cognitive function in patients suffering from mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. A common denominator seen in this disease are low levels of Acetylcholine (ACh) in the brain. By increasing the available stores of ACh it may help elevate some aspects of cognition.

Finally, the potential use of CDP Choline for ADHD to help improve attention performance and for other conditions associated with the inability to focus is still being researched and although promising, more is needed to fully understand all the benefits of this supplement.

Stacking CDP Choline with Other Nootropics


CDP Choline is a safe supplement that can be used on its own to promote cognitive benefits or taken in combination (stacks) with other Nootropics where it is considered to be an outstanding contributor to increase their effects.

This supplement is noted to be an excellent addition to Nootropic stacks, especially when taken in combination with Racetams (Aniracetam, Pramiracetam, Piracetam, Oxiracetam, Noopept and others) to promote synergistic powerful effects that may be more enhanced than when these Nootropics are used on their own.

Racetams increase production and release of Acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter which is considered crucial for many cognitive functions. This action raises the demand in the brain for Acetylcholine which may lead to headaches if not enough choline is present.

Since CDP Choline is considered an efficient source of choline which is needed to produce Acetylcholine, using these Nootropics in combination, may supply the brain with what it needs and will usually tend to fix this problem.

Side Effects and How to Take


CDP Choline is considered well-tolerated by most and generally very safe to use for healthy adults within the appropriate dosage guidelines.

The most typical dosage range reported is between 250mg-500mg per day, which you may want to divide up into two administrations once in the morning and once in the early afternoon.

Avoid taking this supplement too late in the day since this Nootropic is associated with increasing mental energy which for some may cause problems falling asleep.

Although CDP Choline is non-toxic, too much choline can potentially cause side effects including diarrhea, nausea, blurred vision, anxiousness and in rare cases, low or high blood pressure.

CDP Choline is not recommended for breastfeeding or pregnant women due to lack of research. It is best to stay on the safe side and avoid this supplement entirely.

These are just suggested dosage guidelines. Proper dosage can vary since that can depend on many different factors. It is always best to consult with your doctor first before taking supplements to determine what may work for you.

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