Centrophenoxine A Powerful Nootropic for Brain Power and Aging

Centrophenoxine is a source of choline well known to help combat the signs of brain aging, promoting enhanced memory, mental performance and helping to protect the health of your brain.

Type: Cholinergic Supplement
Used For: Memory Enhancement, Learning, Focus, Brain Health, Cognitive Decline, Anti-Aging, Alzheimer’s Disease, Dementia
Half-Life: 4hrs-5hrs
Typical Dosage: 250 mg-1000 mg
Some Possible Drug Interactions: Other Cholinergic Drugs and Anticholinergic Drugs, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors
Supplement Interactions: No Known Interactions

What is Centrophenoxine?


Centrophenoxine (also known as Meclofenoxate or brand name Lucidril) is a cholinergic Nootropic supplement backed by over 50 years of research and testing. Most known for enhancing memory and mental performance, it has also demonstrated to be a powerful contributor to brain health that may help slow down the signs of an aging brain.

Centrophenoxine Brain Supplement Benefits & UsesCentrophenoxine is a modified version of DMAE (Dimethylaminoethanol) which is found naturally in small amounts in the brain, in foods such as fish and is a metabolite of choline.

However, it is thought to have higher bio-availability than DMAE and able to cross the blood-brain barrier more readily due to an additional added compound PCPA (parachlorphenoxyacetic acid) a synthetic substance similar to plant hormones known as auxins.

In addition to notably having the same positive effects as DMAE such as enhancing memory, attention, mental clarity, mood, mental alertness and learning capacity, Centrophenoxine is also known to reduce or even eliminate waste build-up (Lipofuscin) present in older cells, especially in brain cells that occur as we age. 

On the body, you can notice this waste as brown “age spots” or “liver spots”. In the brain, this waste can make up more than a quarter of the volume of your brain cells over time, decreasing healthy cellular function and communication that may contribute to impairing learning and memory.

Centrophenoxine was originally developed in the 1950s to help in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, age-related memory impairments and other cognitive disorders. In parts of Europe, it is still prescribed for senile memory loss under the trade name Lucidril.

In the U.S., Centrophenoxine is available over the counter as a dietary supplement and most commonly used as a cognitive enhancer on its own or in combination with many other Nootropics, particularly popular with Racetams, to achieve optimal Nootropic results.

It is grouped into the category of choline supplements like Alpha GPC and Citicoline due to its believed action on delivering or enhancing levels of choline and raising the activity of Acetylcholine in the brain, an important natural brain chemical strongly associated with several cognitive functions.

In addition, with a number of studies indicating that Centrophenoxine helps to remove cellular waste and potassium build up in aging cells which has been associated with age-related cognitive decline, it may be a great tool for both younger and older people looking to enhance or protect brain power and to keep the mind and memory sharp.

Let’s take a look at what the related benefits are of this highly overlooked powerful Nootropic supplement, its safety profile and dosage guidelines.

Centrophenoxine Benefits for Memory and Learning


Centrophenoxine is thought to be one supplement that has varied benefits related to both cognitive function and brain health. It is purported to enhance memory and mental performance while potentiating protection against the aging brain.

Although the exact actions of Centrophenoxine are not fully understood, it is known to increase the level of Acetylcholine in the synaptic vesicles. This is a powerful natural brain chemical thought to be involved in many important cognitive processes such as learning capacity, reasoning, focus and the formation of memory.

It is theorized by researchers to either act at breaking down into choline in the brain, a precursor to Acetylcholine or by converting into an intermediary phospholipid which is then used to produce this important neurotransmitter.

Increasing cholinergic activity in the brain also promotes heightened synaptic plasticity leading to learning growth in adult minds as the brain becomes more able to form new connections in response to learning or new experiences.

When increasing the supply of Acetylcholine, over time you may notice an enhanced ability to concentrate, problem solve and your memory may improve. 

In addition, Centrophenoxine is believed to stimulate enhanced brain activity that may increase oxygen uptake to the brain and boost the absorption of glucose, the brains primary source of energy.

This action may be responsible for some of the noted benefits of Centrophenoxine such as enhanced mental clarity, a longer attention span and reduced mental fatigue. 

Centrophenoxine

• Boosts Acetylcholine & supports memory
• May reduce lipofuscin deposits
• Promotes brain health & anti-aging

SHOP Top Centrophenoxine Products

Centrophenoxine Anti-Aging Effects


Centrophenoxine is considered to be an effective antioxidant and powerful neuroprotectant. There are several studies indicating that it may have impressive anti-aging effects that may help reduce the signs of an aging brain and slowing down age-related cognitive decline.

This compound acts as a powerful antioxidant, flushing out free radicals and other toxins out of the brain contributing to the maintenance of neuronal health and supporting brain cells.

In addition, Centrophenoxine has shown to reduce and eliminate cellular waste build-up (lipofuscin), a by-product of metabolism that can be found in older cells throughout the body, which is responsible for and what we can physically identify as “age spots” on the skin.

It is also thought to reverse cellular potassium build-up in brain cells which helps increase the ability for neurons and brain cells to communicate. An excess of accumulating potassium has been associated with age-related cognitive decline.

These actions make up the most desired effects of Centrophenoxine where the “cleaning up” of cells has been suggested to have positive effects relating to mood, damage to the brain due to age, including excessive alcohol consumption, drugs or chemicals.

When taking Centrophenoxine in small doses on a regular basis, it may promote the maintenance and repair of neurons which leads to boosting neural communication. This effect may help to improve the signs of age-related cognitive decline, the health and efficiency of neurons and may result in enhancing memory and learning.

Side Effects


Centrophenoxine is considered a safe, non-toxic supplement that is well-tolerated for most healthy people when used at the proper recommended dosages.

Although side effects are rare and thought to be dosage dependent, this supplement has been associated with some potential side effects including irritability, headaches, nausea, dizziness, stomach issues and insomnia.

If these effects occur, you may want to lower the dose or use Centrophenoxine a few times a week rather than seven days.

Do not use Centrophenoxine if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. Centrophenoxine is an enhanced version of DMAE which has been known to raise the risk of birth defects in fetuses (teratogenic).

In addition, this supplement is not recommended for people with high blood pressure, epilepsy or bipolar disorder.

Thus far, Centrophenoxine has shown to be non-toxic but it is always recommended to speak with your doctor first before taking new supplements, especially if you are currently taking medications to ensure this supplement is right for you.

How to Use Centrophenoxine


Generally, the typical dosage of Centrophenoxine for those looking to enhance cognition ranges between 500mg-1000mg per day, however, some experts suggest starting at the lower range which can be taken once per day even at 250 mg or divided into two administrations. Only increase the dose once you know how this supplement affects you and avoid exceeding the daily recommended dosage range.

Centrophenoxine may raise brain energy levels and it is suggested to take it earlier in the day, once at breakfast and once at lunch or early afternoon to potentially avoid any sleeping issues. This compound is water-soluble and may be absorbed more rapidly with a meal.

If you are considering Centrophenoxine for health conditions such as Alzheimer’s, the doses can be much higher. Speak with your doctor first for proper recommendations.

Centrophenoxine is a good choline source with neuroprotective properties that can work very well with Racetam Nootropics such as AniracetamPiracetam or Noopept that may enhance and contribute to their effects. Splitting up the doses or lowering the dose in combination is recommended.

Do not take Centrophenoxine under the tongue (sublingually) as it may cause skin irritation and rash.

These are just guidelines. It is always recommended to consult with your doctor first before trying a new supplement to ensure it is right for you.

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