DMAE Supplements For Anti-Aging, Memory and Brain Power

DMAE is a popular Nootropic supplement promoting a boost in brain power, cognitive functions and helping to slow down the aging brain.

Type: Cholinergic Supplement
Used For: Memory, Learning, Mental Alertness, Focus, Mental Clarity, ADHD, Age-Related Cognitive Decline, Brain Health
Half-Life: 3hrs-4hrs
Typical Dosage: 100 mg-350 mg per day
Some Possible Drug Interactions: Cholinergic and Anti-Cholinergic Drugs, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors
Supplement Interactions: No Known Interactions

What is DMAE?


DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol or Deanol) is a naturally occurring type of amino acid that is found in small amounts in the brain and can also be found in high levels in certain foods such as sardines, anchovies and salmon. As a brain supplement, it is often touted as one of the best supplements to boost brain power.

DMAE Benefits & UsesDMAE is thought to have a variety of benefits. It is known for improving skin firmness, where it is present in many skin care products and often advertised as a “facelift in a jar”.

It is believed to have anti-aging benefits by acting as an antioxidant and defending against free radical damage, strengthening skin cells and their membranes.

As a Nootropic, it is commonly referred to as a great brain booster that is associated with enhancing memory, mental alertness, clarity of thought, focus, attention, executive function and even mood.

DMAE is a compound with two methyl groups, structurally similar to choline which has three. This allowed for a better ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and contribute to increasing the level of the important neurotransmitter Acetylcholine within the brain which is thought to be involved in several mental processes such as memory formation, focus and learning capacity.

In the 1970s, DMAE was sold as a prescription medication under the trade name Deaner, by Riker Laboratories, where it was used to manage behavioral problems and learning difficulties in children with ADHD.

When additional research was required, the costs were too high and development was discontinued. Today, it is available as a nutritional supplement only and is not an approved drug by the FDA to treat or prevent behavioral problems, learning disabilities or any other conditions.

As a source of choline, most people believe that DMAE has more noticeable effects on cognition than a standard form Choline Bitartrate which may be due to its known ability to have much better transportation to the brain which can result in higher cholinergic activity.

However, when looking for similar but more potent Nootropic effects to this compound, Centrophenoxine the modified, more bio-available version of DMAE, is much more commonly used.

So what does DMAE do to produce cognitive benefits and enhance brainpower? In this article, we will review the effects of DMAE and what it is used for, the safety profile of this supplement and the dosage guidelines.

DMAE Benefits


There are many benefits associated with the use of DMAE as a brain supplement. It is most often used to optimize brain power, memory, focus, energy levels and to promote better attentional control.

DMAE is considered a building block for choline, a vitamin-like nutrient that is needed to produce Acetylcholine and raise its levels in the brain.

This is a key chemical messenger used by neurons to communicate that is involved in synaptic plasticity, the formation of memory and linked to many cognitive processes including attention, focus, learning capacity and rational thinking.

When using this supplement, choline levels increase and you may notice a better ability to recall information with much more ease and speed, have a longer attention spanless difficulty focusing on tasks and an increase in mental clarity.

In addition, both DMAE and choline boosts oxygen and glucose uptake in the brain, increasing energy production and helping to provide the brain with more fuel to perform better.

Many users typically report an uplifted mood, a boost in mental alertness, less brain fog and more energy when using this supplement which may be attributed to the efficiency of neurons and their communication.

Another benefit associated with DMAE is that it is believed to improve the skin’s elasticity and smooth out wrinkles by slowing down the production of arachidonic acid in the body that causes inflammation and signs of skin aging. Although these effects can be produced when taken orally, it is most often used topically and is a present ingredient in many beauty products such as face and body creams.

Individuals neurochemistry is unique to them and the effects of a supplement can vary from person to person. For some people the effects of DMAE may be powerful as typically reported in many user logs while others may find taking Centrophenoxine, the enhanced version of DMAE or other high-quality sources of choline such as Alpha GPC or Citicoline work better for them.

More research is needed to determine the full effects and benefits of DMAE. It is available as a dietary supplement only and is not an approved drug by the FDA to prevent or treat any conditions.

DMAE

• Boosts Acetylcholine to support memory
• Promotes enhanced cognitive function
• May have neuroprotective properties

SHOP Top DMAE Products

DMAE Effects in the Brain


DMAE (dimethylaminoethanol) is used by the body to produce choline, a nutrient similar to Vitamin B involved in healthy brain function and the growth and maintenance of cell membranes (cells protective layer) throughout the entire body.

Choline is needed to synthesize Acetylcholine (ACh). This is an important neurotransmitter involved in several mental processes such as the formation of memory, learning capacity and focus. It also plays a crucial role in neuroplasticity, which is the ability for neurons to form new connections.

Research suggests that DMAE may work by inhibiting the metabolism and use of choline by other tissues, which causes more free choline in the bloodstream, enters the brain and stimulates cholinergic receptors to produce more Acetylcholine.

However, how much of the choline from DMAE molecules actually reaches the brain has been debated by researchers and is why the Nootropic Centrophenoxine, a stronger source of choline and a modified version of DMAE was developed.

Additionally, DMAE is believed to reduce cellular waste product that accumulates in brain cells which have been associated with age-related cognitive decline. The permeability and fluidity of nerve membranes are both believed to increase which allows nutrients to flow in and waste product to be removed.

The accumulation of molecular waste increases as we age as viscosity declines. This action may help slow down the signs of the aging brain but this effect is thought to be much more prominent when taking Centrophenoxine.

Is DMAE Safe to Use?


DMAE is generally well tolerated and appears to be safe when taken orally within the appropriate dosages for short-term or occasional use.

Although most people do not experience any side effects when using DMAE within the recommended dosage range, it may pose some potential side effects which may be due in some cases, to the dose being too high.

The following side effects have been reported including confusion, drowsiness, stomach upset, low mood, headaches, and in rare cases, high blood pressure. Lesser side effects may occur such as vivid dreams and muscle tension.

DO NOT USE DMAE if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy. DMAE may be teratogenic, meaning it may potentially cause birth defects when used by women who are pregnant.

Do not take DMAE if you have epilepsy or bipolar disorder as it may worsen the condition. Additionally, if you have liver or kidney disease, this supplement should be avoided as these conditions may affect the levels of this supplement.

Since DMAE is thought to raise choline levels, which in turn, may increase the production of Acetylcholine, this supplement may interact with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitors.

If you are considering using DMAE, it is recommended to consult with your doctor for advice on whether this supplement is right for you.

Dosage Guidelines


The typical average recommended dosage range of DMAE is between 100 mg- 350 mg per day in total, that can be taken once or divided into two doses. In some cases, doses up to 600 mg per day have been used.

DMAE for oral use is available in capsules and powder forms. It is used for a variety of reasons and is present in various product mixtures, making the dosage range widely variable.

It is always recommended to start at the lower dosage range when using a new supplement to help you gauge your body’s effect and see what works best for you. Only raise the dose when you have determined how this supplement effects you.

It is recommended to take DMAE in the morning and ideally with a meal for best absorption.

These are just dosage guidelines. If you have any questions or concerns, please consult your doctor first before taking DMAE.

Rate this article : 1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (10 votes, average: 4.30 out of 5)

Loading...

  1. Zahniser NR, Chou D, Hanin I. Is 2-dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) indeed a precursor of brain acetylcholine? A gas chromatographic evaluation. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1977 Mar;200(3):545-59.[source]
  2. Liu S, Chen Z, Cai X, Sun Y, Zhao C, Liu F, Liu D. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol and compound amino acid on D-galactose induced skin aging model of rat. ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:507351. doi: 10.1155/2014/507351. Epub 2014 Jul 14.[source]
  3. Grossman R. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2005;6(1):39-47.[source]
  4. Jope RS, Jenden DJ. Dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) metabolism in rat brain and its effect on acetylcholine synthesis. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1979 Dec;211(3):472-9[source]
  5. Haubrich DR, Gerber NH, Pflueger AB. Deanol affects choline metabolism in peripheral tissues of mice. J Neurochem. 1981 Aug;37(2):476-82.[source]
  6. Russell RW, Jenden DJ. Behavioral effects of deanol, of hemicholinium and of their interaction. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1981 Aug;15(2):285-8.[source]
  7. Haubrich DR, Gerber NH, Pflueger AB. Deanol affects choline metabolism in peripheral tissues of mice. J Neurochem. 1981 Aug;37(2):476-82.[source]
  8. Sergio W. Use of DMAE (2-dimethylaminoethanol) in the induction of lucid dreams. Med Hypotheses. 1988 Aug;26(4):255-7.[source]
  9. Millington WR, McCall AL, Wurtman RJ. Deanol acetamidobenzoate inhibits the blood-brain barrier transport of choline. Ann Neurol. 1978 Oct;4(4):302-6.[source]
  10. Siesjö BK, Agardh CD, Bengtsson F. Free radicals and brain damage. Cerebrovasc Brain Metab Rev. 1989 Fall;1(3):165-211.[source]
  11. Dimpfel W, Wedekind W, Keplinger I. Efficacy of dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) containing vitamin-mineral drug combination on EEG patterns in the presence of different emotional states. Eur J Med Res. 2003 May 30;8(5):183-91.[source]
  12. Grossman R. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2005;6(1):39-47.[source]
  13. Fisher MC, Zeisel SH, Mar MH, Sadler TW. Inhibitors of choline uptake and metabolism cause developmental abnormalities in neurulating mouse embryos. Teratology. 2001 Aug;64(2):114-22.[source]
  14. PFEIFFER C.C., JENNEY E.H., GALLAGHER W., SMITH R.P., BEVAN W. Jr., KILLAM K.F., KILLAM E.K., BLACKMORE W. “Stimulant effect of 2-dimethylaminoethanol; possible precursor of brain acetylcholine.”Science. 1957 Sep 27;126(3274):610-1.[source]
  15. Dimpfel W, Wedekind W, Keplinger I. Efficacy of dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) containing vitamin-mineral drug combination on EEG patterns in the presence of different emotional states. Eur J Med Res. 2003 May 30;8(5):183-91.[source]
  16. Kostopoulos GK, Phillis JW. The effects of dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) on cerebral cortical neurons. Psychopharmacol Commun. 1975;1(3):339-47[source]
  17. Blin O, Audebert C, Pitel S, Kaladjian A, Casse-Perrot C, Zaim M, Micallef J, Tisne-Versailles J, Sokoloff P, Chopin P, Marien M. Effects of dimethylaminoethanol pyroglutamate (DMAE p-Glu) against memory deficits induced by scopolamine: evidence from preclinical and clinical studies. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2009 Dec;207(2):201-12. doi: 10.1007/s00213-009-1648-7. Epub 2009 Sep 16.[source]
  18. Jus A, Villeneuve A, Gautier J, Jus K, Villeneuve C, Pires P, Villeneuve R. Deanol, lithium and placebo in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia. A double-blind crossover study. Neuropsychobiology. 1978;4(3):140-9.[source]
  19. Kostopoulos GK, Phillis JW. The effects of dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) on cerebral cortical neurons. Psychopharmacol Commun. 1975;1(3):339-47.[source]
  20. Lindeboom SF, Lakke JP. Deanol and physostigmine in the treatment of L-dopa-induced dyskinesias. Acta Neurol Scand. 1978 Aug;58(2):134-8.[source]
  21. Malanga G, Aguiar MB, Martinez HD, Puntarulo S. New insights on dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) features as a free radical scavenger. Drug Metab Lett. 2012 Mar;6(1):54-9.[source]
  22. Fisher MC, Zeisel SH, Mar MH, Sadler TW. Perturbations in choline metabolism cause neural tube defects in mouse embryos in vitro. FASEB J. 2002 Apr;16(6):619-21.[source]
  23. Zeisel S.H. “Choline: Critical Role During Fetal Development and Dietary Requirements in Adults” Annual Review of Nutrition. 2006; 26: 229–250.[source]
  24. Dylewski DP, Nandy S, Nandy K. Effects of centrophenoxine on lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium of old mice. Neurobiol Aging.[source]
  25. Zs-Nagy I. Pharmacological interventions against aging through the cell plasma membrane: a review of the experimental results obtained in animals and humans. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2002 Apr;959:308-20; discussion 463-5[source]
  26. Jope RS, Jenden DJ. Dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) metabolism in rat brain and its effect on acetylcholine synthesis. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1979 Dec;211(3):472-9.[source]
  27. Millington WR, McCall AL, Wurtman RJ. Deanol acetamidobenzoate inhibits the blood-brain barrier transport of choline. Ann Neurol. 1978 Oct;4(4):302-6.[source]
  28. Uhoda I, Faska N, Robert C, Cauwenbergh G, Piérard GE. Split face study on the cutaneous tensile effect of 2-dimethylaminoethanol (deanol) gel. Skin Res Technol. 2002 Aug;8(3):164-7.[source]
  29. Casey DE. Mood alterations during deanol therapy. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1979 Apr 11;62(2):187-91.[source]
  30. Grossman R. The role of dimethylaminoethanol in cosmetic dermatology. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2005;6(1):39-47.[source]

Top Rated DMAE Supplements






Leave A Comment

Our Site uses session cookies to enhance the user experience. By continuing to use the site you agree to our cookie policy. OK