Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) Review The Major Benefits For Your Brain

Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) is a supplement with a varied list of benefits for both the body and especially the brain. It is known for its powerful Nootropic effects promoting enhanced memory, focus and mental energy and for its important neuroprotective properties.

Type: Natural Nootropic
Used For: Memory, Mental Energy, Focus, Clarity, Mental Alertness, Brain Health, Age-Related Memory Deficits, Anti-Aging, Athletic Performance, Cognitive Function, Alzheimer’s Disease, Senile Depression
Half-Life: 1hr-4hrs
Typical Dosage: 500 mg-1,500 mg per day
Drug Interactions: Acenocoumarol (Sintrom), Warfarin (Coumadin)
Supplement Interactions: D-Carnitine

What is Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR)?


Acetyl-L-Carnitine most commonly known as ALCAR or ALC, is an acetylated version of L-Carnitine, a popular sports supplement most commonly used for weight loss and by bodybuilders and athletes as a health supplement to improve energy levels and muscle strength.

ALCAR Supplement Benefits & UsesAlthough there many noted benefits to the body when taking L-Carnitine, ALCAR is used as a powerful brain booster and well respected for its Nootropic and neuroprotective effects that are believed to provide additional positive benefits for both brain function and intellect.

If you are looking to boost physical and mental energy, memory, ability to concentrate, mental sharpness and neuroplasticity, this supplement may be worth looking into.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine is a highly bio-available version and one of several forms of the micro-nutrient L-Carnitine, a derivative of the amino acid lysine that is naturally produced in the body.

Unlike L-Carnitine supplements and where the two are often confused, the acetyl group in ALCAR allows the molecule to cross the blood-brain barrier, acting to work within the brain and not just in the body. This provides additional benefits, other than its powerful effects on energy, that are associated with improving brain functions in ways that using L-Carnitine cannot.

Carnitine occurs in the body and is made in the liver and kidneys. It can be found in cells in the brain, heart, sperm and especially the muscles and plays a role in burning fat to produce energy.

The cells used it to transport long-chain fatty acids from food sources (mostly red meat) into the mitochondria of cells or the power plants of cells. It is then converted into ATP and supplies the entire body with energy.

Carnitine also plays an important role in transporting the generated toxins out of the cells, which helps to prevent their accumulation. As we age, it is thought that carnitine levels naturally decrease.

Although these two supplements are the same amino acid with similar benefits, they are different forms. ALCAR is believed to boost mitochondrial activity in the brain and produce acetyl groups that may be used to make a primary and important brain chemical Acetylcholine, which influences many mental functions.

Additionally, ALCAR is used to boost both physical and mental energy, cognition and for its anti-aging effects by helping to eliminate toxins including in brain cells.

ALCAR is considered a safe and generally well-tolerated Nootropic. It is sold as a readily available health supplement that does not require a prescription to purchase.

This article will examine the benefits associated with ALCAR, what this supplement is additionally used for, the potential side effects and dosage guidelines.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) Benefits and Effects


Acetyl-L-Carnitine, most commonly known as ALCAR is a Nootropic supplement that has been extensively studied and is known to have a variety of powerful benefits, promoting enhanced brain function, cognition and neuroprotection.

It is most popularly used to increase energy (mental and physical) boost memory and enhance concentration where these effects are reported to be the most obvious.

The primary Nootropic function of ALCAR is that it is believed to become a substrate for the production of Acetylcholine and many of the cognitive enhancing benefits of this supplement are thought to be mostly associated with this action.

Acetylcholine is a powerful chemical in the brain influencing many cognitive processes such as memory formation, recall, focus, concentration, attention and learning capacity.

Although the Nootropic effects of ALCAR may be experienced differently, many users report noticing an enhanced ability to recall information, a better ability to focus on tasks, a longer attention span, enhanced ability to think more quickly and with more clarity when using this supplement.

The effects of ALCAR seem to be the most noticeable when used in combination with other Nootropics such as Racetams and Choline supplements, where they are thought to work in synergy to increase their unique effects.

Additionally, ALCAR has shown to improve cellular energy in specific parts of the brain, increasing levels of Norepinephrine in the hippocampus and Serotonin in the cortex.

These are important neurotransmitters commonly targeted in anti-depressants and are thought to be involved in regulating mood and social behavior, alertness and focused attention. This may support this supplements potential use for depression and why many users report an uplifted mood when taking ALCAR.

Finally one of the most important benefits associated with the use of ALCAR is that it acts as a powerful antioxidant, combating damaged cells caused by cellular oxidation and reducing the signs of aging in the brain. With use over time, this may act as a neuroprotectant helping to promote healthier neural structures.

ALCAR flushes out toxins and waste product in brain tissues that accumulate with age (foods, alcohol consumption, cleaning products and several others) which over time, the brain absorbs causing damage to brain cells and impairing their function.

In addition, ALCAR removes lipofuscin in cells and restores them to levels of healthy functioning. These are damaged fat cells that naturally accumulate as we age. On the skin, lipofuscin is noticeable as “age spots or brown spots” but in the brain, their development and accumulation can lead to impairing brain function.

This waste build-up has been associated with memory loss, inability to focus, fatigue, depression and even chronic pain. The development of many neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease may be rooted in this kind of damage.

By helping your brain remove damaged cells, toxins and waste you can significantly reduce the risk of neurodegenerative disorders and promote support for cognition and brain function.

ALCAR Uses and Other Benefits for the Brain


ALCAR is a natural compound that appears to have many other benefits for the brain other than its most common use as a powerful cognitive enhancer.

It is often used in medical treatments to help slow down the rate of decline associated with several neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s. This supplement has been reported by patients to aid with mental and behavioral performance, at least to some degree and may be particularly helpful in the early stages of these conditions.

Acetyl-L-carnitine supplements may be useful for age-related memory loss and depression in the elderly. Studies have shown that elderly patients given this Nootropic have performed better when tested on verbal and directional memory. It is also thought to be effective at elevating mood and reducing social anxiety in elderly patients suffering from depression.

In addition, preliminary research suggests that ALCAR may be a useful therapeutic agent to improve cognitive deficits after chronic use of alcohol.

Finally, the Natural Medicines Database suggests that ALCAR may be possibly effective for diabetic neuropathy, age-related testosterone deficiency, chronic cerebral ischemia, age-related fatigue and cognitive impairments, early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and Peyronie’s disease.

Although research is promising more studies are needed to determine the effects of ALCAR. Currently, this supplement is not an approved drug by the FDA in the USA to treat or prevent any conditions and is only sold as a health supplement. It is recommended to speak with your doctor first to ensure that this supplement is right for you.

Is Acetyl-L-Carnitine Safe To Use?


ALCAR is considered safe and generally well tolerated. Side effects may be rare or mild and are often associated with high doses.

The most commonly reported side effect is mild nausea which may be rectified by taking this Nootropic with food. Other potential mild side effects may occur including headaches, stomach cramps, vomiting and difficulty falling asleep if taken too late in the day.

In order to potentially combat headaches, it may be a good idea to reduce choline dosages if you are currently taking any of these types of Nootropics in combination with ALCAR which may occur due to excess choline.

If side effects occur, you may want to try lowering the dose which will usually eliminate the problem. It is recommended to start at the lower range of the recommended dosage to first see how this Nootropic effects you before raising the dose.

There isn’t enough research to determine the safety of Acetyl-L-Carnitine for children, pregnant or nursing women and you should avoid this supplement as a precaution.

Additionally, people diagnosed with seizure disorders or thyroid problems should not take ALCAR since it may worsen these conditions.

ALCAR Dosage and How to Use


The most typical recommended daily dosage range of ALCAR is between 500 mg-1,500 mg either taken once (500 mg) or divided up into two administrations once in the morning and once in the early afternoon.

For some users, 250 mg once a day a few times a week can be sufficient and effective. Studies have shown this supplement can be taken safely at up to 1,500 mg daily.

ALCAR is commonly taken in combinations with many other Nootropics to amplify the effects. You may want to consider taking it in conjunction with choline supplements such as Alpha GPC or Citicoline.

The half-life of Acetyl-L-Carnitine is approximately 1-4 hours. It may be best to take it in the morning rather than at night to avoid difficulty falling asleep.

In addition, this supplement is water-soluble and it is recommended to take it with a meal to avoid potential nausea.

It is always recommended to speak with your doctor first before taking any new supplements to learn about the proper dosage, potential interactions or contradictions it may have with other drugs or supplements. These are just dosage guidelines.

Acetyl-L-Carnitine Review


Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR) is taken as a Nootropic supplement in doses ranging from 250 mg-500 mg believed to have many positive, and diverse benefits for the brain.

Known to provide support for memory functions, enhance focus and boost mental energy, it is also considered to be a powerful brain booster with much potential in the future to improve the health of the brain and memory functions in many conditions.

ALCAR is considered a safe supplement that does not require a prescription to purchase and stacks well with many other Nootropics acting to increase their effects.

For people looking to boost cognitive abilities, defend against aging and promote better brain health this is the supplement you may want to try.

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